Phone, Source Code, and App Market Now Available for Android

By October 27, 2008 1 comment

In tandem with the release of the G1 through T-Mobile last week comes the full Android Market. With a fledgling collection of applications available, the list is not that impressive, but there already seem to be some userful and/or entertaining options available. An extensive list of reviews are available on the AndroidApps YouTube channel from San Francisco-based AppVee, an application review site currently in beta. A selection from AndroidApp reviews, without Brian's Ben Stein-styled narrative, follows:

target="_blank">Locale changes phone settings (network, ringer volume, ringtone, twitter, wallpaper) based on conditions (battery, calender, contact, location, time). Easy-to-use configuring means the user rarely needs to manually change settings. Picsay inserts captions, speech bubbles, props and special effects into album images to share with contacts or import into other android apps. A straighforward application that is fun and free.

Another recipient of the Android Developer Challenge is called Maverick . Surprisingly this App has nothing to do with the Republican Presidential candidate. Instead it is an Instant Messaging and Multimedia Messaging service, with Google Chat support, simple drawing functionality and geographical location message features. The screen captures from the Multiple Facets site do not reveal any especially "maverick" qualities.

There are several iPhone App imports, such as Shazam and iMeem, but it appears that there won't be a Facebook App for Android any time soon.

With Android's source code released on Tuesday, Google is maintaining its open source prime directive. This resource will provide the means to create a rich network for developers and consumers as long as Google keeps its word and developers stick to the "nonfragmentation agreement." The agreement aims to prevent "code forking," where code changes create non-compatible forms of the Android operating system, effectively fragmenting one type from another. Sticking to the agreement will keep all of the code changes supportable by all future Google handsets.

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[...] The Android Market is launching their paid applications section for the U.S. and U.K. this week. By allowing pricing for applications running on Google’s mobile phone operating system, the company is providing incentive for developers and revenue for Google - they receive thirty percent of revenue. [...]

Submitted by Android Market Launches Paid Apps This Week (not verified) - on February 19, 2009 at 02:09 pm

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