Twitter As Famous As Facebook, More Popular With African-Americans

By April 30, 2010

A report on Twitter from Edison Research was released yesterday that shows who are tweeting these days. This year 87 percent of people have heard of Twitter, up from five percent in 2008 and 26 percent in 2009. Despite the differ

ence in adoption, awareness of Twitter is nearly the same as awareness of Facebook (88 percent). Even though awareness of Twitter is so high, only seven percent of respondents ever use Twitter - a huge increase of membership from two percent in 2009.
Twitter users are habitual - nearly one third use the service at least once per day, thirty percent at least once per week. Only fifteen percent use the service less than monthly. Still, Facebook is far more popular - over forty percent of respondents have a profile on the most popular of social networking sites.
From those who use Twitter at least once per month, African Americans make up 24 percent of the general Twitter population, while only making up 13.5 percent of the total US population in US Census data
from 2008. Relating to the black demographic in this country (African-American and multi-race Black individuals combined), the median age is younger than with Whites. This was cited as a possible explanation of the discrepancy between US and Twitter Black populations by Business Insider today
- the median age is thirty, "a full seven years younger than for white Americans." Since Twitter is more popular in the 25-34 demographic, the population is skewed towards the age for more potential microbloggers.
The BI article also poses that Blacks and Hispanics access the Internet more from mobile devices than Whites. Since Twitter's functionality lends itself well to mobile devices, and more Twitter users also access the mobile Web, it is again more likely that more users will be Black. Additionally, a higher proportion of celebrity Twitter users are famous African Americans, most significantly pop culture empress Oprah, making Twitter even more mainstream for Black Internet users.

Legal mentions © L’Atelier BNP Paribas