When voice recognition meets mobile shopping

By December 21, 2012 Drop a comment
woman shopping using her smartphone

Maluuba recently updated its Android app to support voice search for finding apparel or other items. Natural language support has already helped users keep organized, share on social networks and many other functions on their smartphones.

 

Voice assistant app Maluuba released online shopping functionality that enables users to ask for item information during the holiday season on. A Siri alternative for Android phones, the app was developed to give more features and use natural language, compared to the Voice Search app that was developed by Google. This newest update brings voice recognition to gift shopping, bringing up results from queries such as “Where can I buy some shoes?” or “I’m looking for a new blender.” Maluuba has partnered with search engines to bring up results on a number of topics, and with this release, Best Buy and Walmart have also linked their content to results, as well as Google Shopping outside of the US.

Using voice to get organized, share with friends or explore locally

Maluuba applies its natural language API to a variety of functions that smartphone users use. The app performs communication tasks like making calls, and populating text messages and emails. There are also organizer features, and social ones as well - after connecting to Facebook, Twitter and Foursquare, users can post or check in, as well as share events. With their partnership to Wolfram Alpha and Yahoo, they have broadened further what the app can be used for, when looking for empirical answers. However, the shopping feature not only brings more usability to Maluuba, but it could also encourage mobile commerce by circumventing some of the interface-related obstacles that may stand in the way for some consumers.

Customers can shop by price, brand or category through voice or touch interface

Shopping through Maluuba does not rely on voice recognition alone. The results populate a touch-driven interface where customers can navigate through filters of price, brand or category that may be quicker than refining each search by voice. But that is possible too - we could say, “I want to buy a new jacket from American Eagle.” Once the right item is found, it can be purchased through the app, as well as shared on social networks. Maluuba could benefit with more brand partners and an easier payment interface, but this more intuitive way of shopping is already valuable to the mobile commerce space, especially during an important retail period.

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